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splitting 1 column of data into multiple columns after ascii export

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Mayur Savla posted on Sat, Oct 1 2011 7:22 AM

I have a 512 lines and 1024 samples per line raw image.

I was able to export data using nanoscope analysis ascii export function.

The data gets exported as 1 coulum with 1024*512=524288 rows.

Is there a way to split the data so that I have 512 rows (representing the number of lines in my scan) and 1024 columns (representing samples per line in my scan) in excel or any other software?

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replied on Sat, Oct 1 2011 6:24 PM

Sounds like a good training exercise for using Python Mayur.

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Mayur,

 

There is an option as part of the ASCII export to select the number of columns to export. Select only one data channel to keep it simple. Did you try this?

 

Steve

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I did , when you have 1 channed and you increase the number of colums it adds empty columns and the 1st cloumn is the only one with data.

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If you use Format Columns =1024 during ASCII export, NanoScope Analysis creates a text file of 1024 columns, each 30 characters wide. 

Excel has difficulty dealing with such a wide spreadsheet.  I tried using Data>Get External Data From Text to import a 1024x1024 and it gave a message that the data set was too large to fit in a single worksheet (and then it only imported 256 columns).  If you first import the data and then use the "text to columns" delimited by spaces it makes some rows that are very short (9 columns) and some that are very long (1024 columns). 

If you look at the same file with a good text editor (not notepad, I use SciTE), you can see that all of the data is there in the exported text file.  Maybe Python or MatLab or Igor is a better choice for analysis than Excel...

--Bede

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