The Nanoscale World

AFM and neurodegenerative diseases (part I): Correlating Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Fluorescence Microscopy to detect changes in cell morphology caused by protein aggregates of mutant Huntingtin


Mon, Jan 4 2010

Downloads: 26
File size: 192.1kB
Views: 2,308
AFM and neurodegenerative diseases (part I): Correlating Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Fluorescence Microscopy to detect changes in cell morphology caused by protein aggregates of mutant Huntingtin

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) operates by scanning a sharp tip, supported on a sensitive force-sensing cantilever, over the sample and thereby producing a three-dimensional image of the surface. As the tip scans across the samples, changes in the interactions with the surface alter the vertical deflection of the tip. These changes in deflection are monitored via an optical detection method. A feedback control system responds to those changes by adjusting the tip-sample distance in order to maintain a constant deflection. It is this vertical movement of the tip that is used to produce a topographical image of the surface. Both contact mode and TappingMode™ have demonstrated their high value in life sciences applications, especially during the 5 past years.

Copyright (c) 2011 Bruker Instruments