The Nanoscale World

Mapping Graphene's Surface Potential with <20nm Resolution


posted by Thomas Mueller
Thu, Feb 27 2014

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Mapping Graphene's Surface Potential with <20nm Resolution

A PeakForce KPFM study in a controlled <1ppm water and oxygen environment
Join us as Bruker's Gregory Andreev demonstrates important new insights into graphene physics using the combination of PeakForce KPFM and the GloveBox Integrated System with guest speaker Aravind Vijayaraghavan from the University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute.
Graphene, the world’s thinnest, strongest and most conductive material, was first isolated and characterized at The University of Manchester by Professor Andre Geim and Professor Kostya Novoselov. They were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2010 for their research. This transparent, one-atom thick flat sheet of carbon has the potential to revolutionize technology, from smartphones and ultrafast broadband to drug delivery and computer chips.
In this webinar we demonstrate important new insights into Graphene physics using the combination of two unique Bruker technologies: PeakForce KPFM and the GloveBox Integrated System. We find that the <20nm resolution images of Graphene’s surface potential in a controlled <1ppm water and <1ppm oxygen environment is dramatically lower relative to measurements in ambient conditions. The surface potential closely approaches levels expected for intrinsic Graphene which is an effect typically achieved only in vacuum chambers and low temperatures. The ability to achieve similar conditions with the convenience of the Glovebox Integrated System is a truly enabling feature unique to Bruker AFMs.

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